An introduction to the development of the new england and chesapeake regions

But church membership ultimately mattered little, since a lack of clergymen and few churches kept many Virginians from attending church. Differences in Development Between the Chesapeake Regions and New England Differences in Development between the Chesapeake Regions and New England The seventeenth and early eighteenth century, brought thousands of immigrants to America in pursuit of freedom and a new life.

As the number of new indentured laborers declined because of limited chances for advancement and reports of harsh treatment, they were replaced by African slaves. The impact religion had on the Chesapeake region is minimal, however when compared to the overwhelming effect it had in New England.

Even with the small amount of capital needed for tobacco cultivation, former indentured servants at best became subsistence farmers, a class ripe for such calls to rebellion as those proposed by Nathaniel Bacon. The founding of Maryland.

The majority of the indentured servants brought over were single males between the ages of 18 to 25, and the remainder were mostly single women 25 years old or younger. The impact religion had on the Chesapeake region is minimal, however when compared to the overwhelming effect it had in New England.

Eventually, the law was overturned in a revolt led by Protestants in the late seventeenth century. Although the colonies were all united under British rule, they eventually separated into various regions including the Chesapeake region, the New England region, the Middle region, and the Southern region.

New England became a fortress of congregationalism which developed community religion and further strengthened the Puritan church.

The foremost religion of the New England region was Puritanism, which was most prominent in the Massachusetts Bay, Plymouth, and Connecticut colonies. A royal governor appointed justices of the peace, who set tax rates and saw to the building and maintenance of public works, such as bridges and roads.

A majority of the puritans came as family units making the rate of men to women almost equal; this provided a more concrete familial structure.

For a time they even shared the same chapel. Eventually Williams joined the colonies to form Rhode Island. These plans eventually led Calvert to persuade the Maryland assembly to adopt the Act of Toleration.

Differences in Development Between the Chesapeake Regions and New England

This made slaves profitable because planters could rely not only on their labor but that of their children as well. He found the Church of England to be corrupt and stressed the importance of religious tolerance while creating one of the first Baptist churches.

The development of the Chesapeake region was greatly affected by the economy as well. A near civil war broke out and order was not restored untilwhen Lord Baltimore was returned to power.

The majority of the indentured servants brought over were single males between the ages of 18 to 25, and the remainder were mostly single women 25 years old or younger.

The main export produced by the Chesapeake colonies was tobacco. Because wealthy planters built their own wharves on the Chesapeake to ship their crop to England, town development was slow. New England became a fortress of congregationalism which developed community religion and further strengthened the Puritan church.

These indentured servants normally came alone without any family, which did not nurture any familial bonds. Indentured servants and slaves. Those who did not found sanctuary in Rhode Island, where one of the exiles, Roger Williams, founded a colony that offered religious tolerance to any persuasion of Christianity—and even, as ofto Jews.

Religion thus was of secondary importance in the Virginia colony. In the s, the colonial assembly adopted a bicameral pattern: Virginia, Maryland Bythe Virginia colonists had made their fortunes through the cultivation of tobacco, setting a pattern that was followed in Maryland and the Carolinas.

The economy of the Chesapeake region resulted in a great number of indentured servants being brought over from England and other countries. These indentured servants and their situation were the cause of the societal and familial structure that became associated with the Chesapeake regions.

The one common link between New England and the Chesapeake was the treatment of the Indians. This region included the colonies of Maryland and Virginia. The Church of England was the established church in Virginia, which meant taxpayers paid for the support of the church whether or not they were Anglicans.

Tobacco was the mainstay of the Virginia and Maryland economies. This was partly due to their unfamiliarity with each other, but mostly due to the harsh environment in which they were forced to live.The wide gap between the development of The Chesapeake and New England regions was mainly because of the way their lives were centered.

The Chesapeakes were geared around monetary profits and striking it rich, while New Englands focal point was about family and religious freedom.

Chesapeake Colonies: Virginia, Maryland

While New England was a land of towns and villages surrounded by small farms, Virginia and Maryland were characterized by large plantations and little urban development.

The emphasis on indentured labor meant that relatively few women settled in the Chesapeake. The wide gap between the development of The Chesapeake and New England regions was mainly because of the way their lives were centered. The Chesapeakeà  s were geared around monetary profits and à  striking it richà Â, while New Englandà  s focal point was about family and religious freedom.

Chapter 2 in the AP Achiever book of this topic provides a chart to compare the Chesapeake and New England colonies from to Learn with flashcards, games, and more — for free.

Differences in Development between the Chesapeake Regions and New England The seventeenth and early eighteenth century, brought thousands of immigrants to America in pursuit of freedom and a new life/5(1).

- By the ’s, New England, the Chesapeake region and the Southern colonies developed into three distinct societies, despite coming from the same mother country, England. The regions of Colonial America each had a distinctive culture and economy entirely different from the other regions.

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An introduction to the development of the new england and chesapeake regions
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